Jimmy Guterman's blog

media, technology, management, and the rest of it

Archive for March 2008

Living like savages in Chestnut Hill: an update

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Either 20 or 21 Septembers ago, my younger brother moved into a fifth-floor apartment in Back Bay. We dragged the first of his stuff up to the top floor of the elevator-free building. He turned the key in the door, opened it, and discovered that none of the five people living in very close quarters in that studio apartment had even begun to move out. They were all still asleep, in beds spread across the room.

I thought about that this morning as I looked across the living room of our house:

Eli, the model here, still has his own room for now (it’s the only unaffected room on the second floor, but he still has to move eventually because it’ll be Grace’s room when we’re done). The other four of us are stretched across the living room. After more than 20 years together, Jane and I are back in a one-bedroom place … with two other people!

For a more meaningful report on the way we live now, see Jane’s latest report.

Written by guterman

March 28, 2008 at 9:18 am

Posted in random

Greatest song of all time of the week: Junior Senior, "Can I Get Get Get"

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The user-generated video below ain’t much (listen to it with your eyes closed if you wish, though it has charm), but this song offers endless pleasure. It’s like Chic and Abba had a baby! (That’s a compliment, by the way.)

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March 27, 2008 at 1:39 pm

Posted in music

The U.S.P.S. can be a slow medium

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Both of these arrived the same day:

 

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March 27, 2008 at 12:11 pm

Posted in random

Three fictional characters, each equally equipped to discuss our nation’s predicament

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I haven’t offered much political commentary since I came back to Jewels and Binoculars, but I can at least point out trenchant observations when I spot them elsewhere:

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March 27, 2008 at 11:35 am

Posted in random

Chinese Democracy When?

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In my TED talk, I went after Axl Rose for not releasing Chinese Democracy. This amusing stunt takes matters into its own hands.

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March 26, 2008 at 12:55 pm

Posted in music, work

I’ve been known to keep weird work hours, I know…

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…but today was the first time ever I was almost late for a 9 a.m. meeting because I was in the car listening to the ninth inning of a live Red Sox game. Happy spring!

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March 25, 2008 at 9:46 am

Posted in random

Farewell to print

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I love The New York Times. I’ve read it almost every day of my life since I was in high school. For all its recent flaws — the weirdo profiles of the major presidential candidates are the most high-profile — it is still full of the most outstanding reporting. And, on the days that Gail Collins files, it offers up the most penetrating and entertaining opinion.

finalNYT

What’s that? It’s the last print copy of the Times I’ll ever have delivered to my front door. Over the years, I’ve slowly weaned myself off subscriptions to physical newspapers, but it was hard to say no to the Times. The quality was high, the thump of the paper on the sidewalk was a pleasant sound to hear first thing in the morning, I liked the serendipity of walking through a print section, and I felt obligated to pay for the paper at a time when print subscribers were becoming an endangered species. But, after years of wavering, I’m done. The environmental argument alone should have been enough for me, but the simple fact is that I do more and more of my reading on a screen (the only holdouts: fiction and poetry). And plenty of that reading has been from the Times. What finally made me give in to the inevitable was realizing, one barely-dawn morning last week when I was reading the paper at our kitchen table, that I had already read much (most?) of it online. For all the pleasure of holding and print, the Times on paper is just too late. In 2008, today’s paper is yesterday’s news.

So now I’m a freeloader, although you could argue that my personal information, sent to the Times in return for a username and password, may have some value. I rarely, if ever, click on an ad on the Times‘s website. I would gladly pay for the pleasure and convenience of reading the paper online, just as I do for The Wall Street Journal, but I don’t have that option. In this era of advertising-is-the-only-business-model, management at the Times Company has decided that I’ve decided that the value of what it sends to me is zero. I disagree — and I’m not going to pay a premium for the proprietary and little-used Times Reader to make my point.

I’ll miss the paper on paper, and I bet I’ll buy it when I’m on vacation, as a treat, an indulgence. But if even people like me — who adore The New York Times — can no longer justify a print subscription, how can its print version survive, except as a high-priced, scarce product for an increasingly elite audience?

(This originally appeared on the O’Reilly Radar.)

Written by guterman

March 25, 2008 at 9:25 am

Posted in work